Untitled Mural Botanic Gardens

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Artist: Poncho Army
Title: Untitled
Installed: 2016
Materials: Spray Paint
Location: Kidsville Playground, Wagga Wagga Botanic Gardens

Poncho Army was commissioned by Wagga Wagga City Council to paint a mural at Wagga Wagga Botanic Gardens. Over 3 days the artist painted this 12m x 2m wall in the children’s playground area.

The mural reflects nature and showcases the multicultural make-up of the local community and gardens.

Poncho Army ran a three day street art workshop during Youth Week while working on this project. Poncho Army’s workshop focussed on teaching teenagers how to use spray paint safely and effectively as well as skills and artistic techniques for creating urban artworks and murals.

Trina Collins, who works under the pseudonym Poncho Army, is an artist who isn’t afraid to get some paint under her fingernails. Known for her detailed line work, precision cut stencils and signature splatter paint skies, she has appeared in numerous gallery shows, been a finalist in multiple art prizes and exhibited alongside many leading urban and contemporary artists including Banksy, Kid Zoom, ROA, Beastman, Vexta, Reg Mombassa and Anthony Lister.

In June 2012 ArtsHub named Poncho Army as one of the top ten street artists in Australia, that same year she won a 12 month residency at Wollongong City Gallery. Exploding into the art scene in 2013 with her critically acclaimed series ‘Fight or Flight’ Trina began touring her exhibition, running art workshops, and opened Anchors Aweigh Art Studio. Across 2014/15, Trina won multiple EOI public art projects which included painting murals in places around Australia like Albury, Dubbo, Maryborough, Chester Hill, Berkeley, Shellharbour and Wollongong.

Her work is held in collections around the world including New York, Japan, London, Dubai, Los Angeles, New Zealand and Australia. Poncho Army artwork is displayed in the halls of Stanford University Design School (California, USA) and The National Gallery of Australia archive Poncho Army’s works in the Pandora database, which can be accessed by 5200 Australian libraries.